EUROPEAN REVIEW

European Review logo

ISSUE 68 page 8

Euromap  cyprus= Croatia Switzerland Iceland Serbia Russia Turkey Norway Slovenia Ireland Sweden Portugal Spain Belgium Germany Poland Italy Greece Czech Republic Austria France Denmark Netherlands Finland Estonia Malta Hungary Ukraine Slovakia Latvia Luxembourg Lithuania Romania Bulgaria Albania Macedonia Moldova Liechtenstein

Choose a country to take your mouse,clicking on most will show an article on that country

Sites of interest
Apple answers tax critics by stressing European job creation
THE INDUSTRY AROUND WEB APPLICATIONS, or apps, is just about the fastest-growing in the EU (see issue 66) and the giant U.S.-based manufacturer Apple wants Europeans to know the part it plays in the associated job creation. A report from market analysts Vision Mobile says that about half the jobs relating to mobile apps are based on Apple’s iOS software. On top of the 129,000 posts at the company and its suppliers, Apple said that 500,000 jobs have been created in the app economy supported by payments of $6.5 billion made through its app store to developers. Criticised for choosing low-tax Ireland for its international headquarters
AppleHQ
the corporation insisted that it paid ‘every euro of every tax we owe‘ and emphasised its position as the largest private-sector employer in the Cork area of its base. Apple said: ‘Throughout our history, we have created entirely new products – and entirely new industries – by focusing on innovation. This has resulted in nearly 630,000 European jobs at Apple and at developers and businesses supported by Apple’.
Neelie Kroes, the EU Commissioner for the digital agenda, said: ‘The speed of job creation and revenue growth in the app economy is incredible … Apple and others have started an economic revolution, and I want Europe to be front and centre in that action’.

Apple’s international HQ at Cork in Ireland

 

 

 Web sites mentioned in this issue are available at:
 RISCTOX Database:
 European Commission eIDAS page:
e-Signatures to spread across EU from Estonia?
 E-STONIA IS THE TWIST IN THE NAME OF THE BALTIC COUNTRY which marks it as the most ‘wired’ in the EU. Accustomed to voting electronically (see our last issue), its citizens are also happy to use their single e-ID for banking, web purchases, signing leases and official e-papers which the government can scramble so that only the person for whom they were intended can access them. At work Estonians can e-sign expenses and employment contracts and read restricted documents like company annual reports and tax breakdowns without extended paper trails. To take advantage of the system users must have a physical ID card, provided by the government or a bank, or a special SIM card which turns their mobile ‘phone into ID, and a passcode. According to Luukas Ilves, who worked for the European Commission on EU-wide regulations for e-ID, many countries have the same technology, it is just that Estonians have taken it up in greater numbers; 1.2 million of them now make 50 million digital signatures every year. In July the new Electronic Identification and Signature (eIDAS) regulation came into force. It sets down the standards for Member States’ electronic identification and trust services. It will enable, for example, students to enrol at foreign universities, citizens to fill in tax returns in another country and businesses to tender for EU public contracts, all electronically. Luukas hopes that eventually he will be able to log on to Amazon, e-Bay and local web sites with his single Estonian e-ID.
RISCTOX to help workers get info on chemicals

IT SEEMS THE CHEMICALS THAT MAY OCCUR in the workplace are numberless but the European Trade Union Institute (ETUI) has counted at least 100,000 of them for its new database.  It is a simple process to enter the name or identification number of the chemical into a search box on the web page.  The page will then detail the chemical’s classification and labelling under the regulations, its main work uses (solvent, cleaner, paint stripper, etc.), how it affects health, and the occupational diseases it causes.
Of the chemicals listed trade unions have identified 570 as substances that should be declared of very high concern (SVHC) according to the EU’s REACH regulations. The European Chemicals Authority (ECHA), which proposes candidates for this list, has only named 155 however. The database will advise if the substance can cause cancer, allergies, disrupt the hormonal system or put the reproductive system at risk.

 

RISCTOX




Top of page

 

 


 

 cyprus= Croatia Switzerland Iceland Serbia Russia Turkey Norway Slovenia Ireland Sweden Portugal Spain Belgium Germany Poland Italy Greece Czech Republic Austria France Denmark Netherlands Finland Estonia Malta Hungary Ukraine Slovakia Latvia Luxembourg Lithuania Romania Bulgaria Albania Macedonia Moldova Liechtenstein